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October 2012

Brent Wick is a Portland, OR based illustrator who is influenced by animals and patterns. He works mostly in pen and ink but is known to create a collage or two. He draws inspiration from skateboarding, motorcycling and hikes in the Cascade Range.

On view October 30th – November 29th, 2012

You can see more of his work here.
For more information, please contact the curator.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters
128 SW Third Avenue
Portland, OR
M-F: 6am-7pm / S-S: 7am-7pm
503-295-6144

No Title

For No Title, his first solo exhibition at Stumptown’s Downtown location, John David Knight has made paintings with materials such as vegetable oil, Fred Meyer Bacon and Red Baron pizza. These economically purchased consumables emerge as raw materials accompanying painting. They are readied, cheap and self-preserving, appearing here as ornamentation, decoration and patterning on surface.

The works in No Title mirror, mimic, and look the part of a limitless amount of branded artworks. They desire the .jpeg image of art available online via the art blog. Seemingly patterned and spilled, they are both in reference to large abstractions and Ikea textiles. In such, No Title stands for landscape painting, sofa painting, expressionist painting, blue chip painting, abject painting, and whatever else painting. In the image of “contemporary” and “current” art, these pieces are prepared and mechanically readied like so-called gourmet frozen meals found at mega grocers. For immediate consumption.

John David Knight currently attends Pacific Northwest College of Art’s master’s class in visual studies. He has recently exhibited in Portland at Disjecta, ΜΕΣ(s)Α Project Space, and Lodge Gallery at Allied Works and in Cincinnati at Third Party Gallery.

On view November 4 – November 30, 2012
Opening reception 5-7pm Sunday November 4

Contact May Barruel: may@stumptowncoffee.com

Stumptown Coffee Roasters
128 SW Third Avenue, Portland, OR
M-F: 6am-7pm/S-S: 7am-7pm
503-295-6144
www.stumptowncoffee.com

Figurations of the Inexorable

These intaglio prints utilize the idea of apocalypse as a lens through which a multitude of subjects are examined. These include the void, perceptions of time, a linear view of historical narrative and the process by which the real becomes contextualized by recorded history.

On view October 29th – December 3rd, 2012

For more information, please contact the curator.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters
3356 SE Belmont Street
Portland, OR
M-F: 6am-9pm / S-S: 7am-9pm

Entropy

In dealing with the illusion of time I’m focusing on its genesis, the past, the future and the present. The past is made of memories and can only be remembered. It can only be observed in this present moment. The future is a mental construct made of hopes and dreams. It can only be observed when it becomes the present moment, the EVER CHANGING PRESENT MOMENT.

In an attempt to record the ever changing present moment, I have realized that change tends to move towards greater disorder or ENTROPY. In this body of work I have begun to explore the entropy of a graphite line on paper. I decided to keep the way in which I construct each composition similar to the next, working my way from left to right and top to bottom.
- Bruce Collin Paulson

On view October 2nd – October 30th, 2012
Opening reception 6-8 pm Sunday, October 14th

For more information, please contact the curator.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters
3356 SE Belmont Street
Portland, OR
M-F: 6am-9pm / S-S: 7am-9pm

A photography group show featuring the recent works of Jake Arcularius, Olivia Bee, Ashby Lee Collinson, Nicole Mark, Sarah Meadows, Missy Prince, Anna Shelton, Jenny Simmons, Rebecca Thom, John Voves, Kersti Jan Werdal, and Dan Wilson.

With strong ties to the Pacific Northwest, these twelve photographers convey in their quiet, day to day practice, the capricious feelings which often result from experiencing the regionʼs atmospheric changes. Whether they abandon themselves to the creative darkness of its famously long, rainy winters or joyfully relish our fleeting, euphoric summers, they have all come to accept that they wouldnʼt want it any other way. —May Barruel, curator of the exhibition

“In New York City, there is a tree from the Olympic Rain Forest inside a glass cage in the basement of the Museum of Natural History, as frozen as a stuffed moose head. I remember seeing the trunk of that tree, and a little stuffed deer nearby, and some salal bushes and grass and ferns and other plants from the forest inside this window display. In the explanatory museum text, they got it just about right: the story of a single drop of rain that comes from the Pacific wind that feeds on the moisture of the warm sea, sweeps into the land, is forced up the mountains, then falls and becomes part of the ice or snow that will eventually return to earth. Itʼs a fine story, as nature tales go. Lots of conflict and resolution. But Iʼd hate to learn about this place from a glass cage.”
—Timothy Egan, The Good Rain

Image © Ashby Lee Collinson
Contact May Barruel: may@stumptowncoffee.com

October 4th – October 30th, 2012
Opening reception5 pm – 7 pm Sunday, October 7th

Stumptown Coffee Roasters
128 SW Third Avenue
Portland, OR
M-F: 6am-7pm / S-S: 7am-7pm
503-295-6144
http://stumptowncoffee.com

Matters of Life and Death

I make my work on steel for many reasons. The durability, reflective quality and psychological energy it carries are just a few. Steel is raw and elemental. It conveys strength, permanence and history. The images of architecture and nature I create are meant to connect to those qualities of steel directly. The process of making my work is also connected to the imagery in its industrial nature.

My images come from both the built and the natural environment around us. My eye is attracted to the strictly ordered lines and angles of industrial architecture, as well as the chaotic balance of lines found in nature. The two disparate landscapes connect with the steel medium in different ways. The industrial architecture has a very direct connection, as the structures I etch into steel are usually made of steel themselves. The tree images are organic shapes, and when they are caustically rendered into the surface of the inorganic steel, they have a strong dichotomous connection. Conceptually, I see the two themes working together to represent balance, strength and a power in duality.

The process I use to make my work is a multi-layered combination of new and old techniques, involving photography, silkscreen and acid etching. This process relates to the conceptual ideas of balanced duality, with it’s combining of tools and techniques that are both modern and archaic. I use my creative instincts and design skills along side my power tools and nitric acid. It is both refined and delicate, and at the same time raw and powerful.

On view October 1st – October 29th, 2012

You can see more of his work here.
For more information, please contact the curator.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters
4525 SE Division Street
Portland, OR
M-F: 6am-7pm / S-S: 7am-7pm